Michael Laing (rock_dinosaur) wrote,
Michael Laing
rock_dinosaur

From Edinburgh to Kirkcaldy and back again


'The Tun', a modern glass-fronted building with the inevitable roof-mounted projection in Holyrood Road, Edinburgh, 23rd June, 2009.


'The Tun', a modern glass-fronted building with the inevitable roof-mounted projection in Holyrood Road, Edinburgh, 23rd June, 2009.


Open-top ex-London Transport Routemaster bus No. ERM 163, reg. VLT 163, operating a Mac Tours circular sight-seeing tour passes Horse Wynd and enters Holyrood Park, Edinburgh, 23rd June, 2009.


ScotRail class 170 3-car DMU No. 170 434 in the recently-introduced Saltire livery arrives at Kirkcaldy, Fife, from the north on a service to Edinburgh on the hot and sunny day of 23rd June, 2009. Railway photography seems to be much more difficult than it used to be. Aside from the monotony of the motive-power (in eastern Scotland, almost every train is a class 158 or 170 DMU), it is increasingly difficult to gain access to the lineside. Everywhere, the railway is bordered by high fences or unchecked shrubbery; bridge-parapets have been raised to such a height that they can't be seen over; and access to station platforms is blocked by ticket-gates or, as was the case here, numerous ticket-inspectors. Hence the large expanse of platform evident in this photo, due to the fact that I had to take it from outside the station. The roses add a welcome splash of colour though.


ScotRail class 158 2-car DMU No. 158 732 approaches Kirkcaldy Station, Fife, from the north on a service to Edinburgh in the late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


4-car class 158 DMU in the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, passes beneath the Bennochy Road bridge prior to reversing and working a return service to Edinburgh, it is passed by Edinburgh-bound class 170 3-car DMU No. 170 433 on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


ScotRail 4-car class 158 DMU with No. 158 868 trailing passes beneath the Bennochy Road bridge and proceeds along the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, prior to reversing and working a return service to Edinburgh on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


Viewed from the Bennochy Road bridge, a ScotRail 4-car class 158 DMU with No. 158 868 trailing approaches the 'cat's eyes' at the exit from the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, prior to reversing and working a return service to Edinburgh on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


Standing in the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, a ScotRail 4-car class 158 DMU with No. 158 868 trailing is passed by an unidentified northbound class 170 3-car DMU on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


Standing in the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, a ScotRail 4-car class 158 DMU with No. 158 868 trailing is passed by northbound class 170 3-car DMU No. 170 425 on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


Standing in the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, a ScotRail 4-car class 158 DMU with No. 158 868 trailing is passed by northbound class 170 3-car DMU No. 170 425 on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009.


At last, the photo I was waiting for! Standing in the Down Loop at Kirkcaldy, Fife, a ScotRail 4-car class 158 DMU with No. 158 868 trailing is passed by ScotRail's evening loco-hauled Fife Circle commuter service headed by class 67 No. 67 025 on the hot and sunny late afternoon of 23rd June, 2009. Unfortunately I was caught unprepared and made a right mess of this photo. I didn't have time to set the exposure properly, with the result that the right-hand side of the photo is very over-exposed. (I've tried to rectify it a little with some digital 'burning-in'.) A major problem with digital cameras is that you can't set up your photo and leave the camera switched on until your subject appears, or you'd soon waste your batteries. With a moving subject, you have to turn the camera on, zoom in, and set the exposure and focus all within a second-or-two. It's not the best way to get a good result.


I read recently that some rails from Edinburgh's original tramway system, closed in 1956, had been unearthed in Princes Street during excavation works for the new tramway. Sure enough, on my way past the ongoing works on 23rd June, 2009, I noticed several piles of grooved tram-rail in short lengths where Princes Street has been excavated, adjacent to the Scott Monument. It appears that the old tracks were simply covered over with a layer of tarmacadam when the previous system was abandoned. One would have thought this would have come to light - and caused problems - on the many previous occasions when the road has been dug up with pneumatic drills.


Short lengths of tram-rail from Edinburgh's original tramway-system recovered during excavations in Princes Street for the new tramway. Despite the fifty-three-year time-lapse, the old rails - although worn, corroded and damaged - appear to be remarkably similar to those which are shortly to be installed, which just goes to show what a stupid and short-sighted decision it was to do away with Edinburgh's original tram-system in the first place. I wonder how much more of the original system's 47 route-miles still exists beneath the tarmac of Edinburgh's streets? Perhaps reinstating the whole system might be less costly than has been thought up to now! 23rd June, 2009.


Notice advertising the type of tramway track being installed on the street sections of the Edinburgh tramway, 23rd June, 2009. To me, it looks identical to the old rails as seen in the previous photos.
Tags: buses, edinburgh, scotland, trams
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